Portraits

Anna in profile

Anna in profile
Pencil portrait, life study

High haunch

High haunch
Life study, Pencil (negative)

Pink suits her

Pink suits her
Mixed media

Beau, Bruno de Juro - watercolour

Beau, Bruno de Juro
Watercolour

Fire in a stream

Fire in a stream
Pencil study from life

Dalmatian
Conté Pastel

Lorenzo
Sepia sketch

Arabian horse in flight

Arabian Horse in Flight
Watercolour

pencil and watercolour

Portrait illustration
Watercolour, pencil overlay

Line pencil portrait
Sketch

Arabian horse in flight

Fingers and toes
Pencil, life study

pencil and watercolour

Dogue de Bordeaux
Watercolour

Artist Interview with Steve Jones (Redbubble)

As an artist and photographer, what gives you more joy? Painting, sketching or setting up for a photograph?
The creative process itself brings me joy regardless of medium.

What came first the pencil or the camera?
Definitely the pencil, in fact the earliest memory I have is of painting on a tiny A-board in a playgroup with the sun shining down through the skylight onto thick daubs of yellow poster paint. I would have been about 3 years old. I have always found a channel for my creative side through a whole range of mixed media. The camera and photography came later, handling my first SLR and the mysteries of a darkroom when I was 17 years old. My love of photography was born afresh with the digital explosion; I was simply amazed to witness images on my computer only an instant after taking them. Wowed further by an elaborate underwater housing case that I purchased for my IXUS which proved to be an invaluable accessory for creative photography in warmer parts of the world. And then one day someone lent me their digital SLR, a Canon EOS 10D – it took my breath away.

Animals play a big part in your work. Why?
I love animals, dogs passionately so. They are fascinating subjects and great fun to stalk with a camera. My 10 month old Pug, Caviar, is a particularly animated character and at the same time a geometric wonder of perfect squares, circles and triangles depending on the angle of view and often I’m laughing out loud behind the camera whilst I’m photographing him. As Barb Leopold says “When photographing animals, I always try for eye contact as it makes a direct connection to the viewer of the photo” and this is certainly my objective too, though if only asking a dog to stare into the lens of a camera and say “cheese” was as easy as asking a person!

Where do you get your ideas from?
Everywhere. I keep reference of anything that catches my eye and holds my attention. Online art communities such as redbubble I find incredibly inspiring, to see the work of so many talented people globally, all the different creative styles, certainly this contributes towards new ideas.

What would you rather be regarded more as photographer or artist?
Interesting question. I would love to be regarded as both but more see myself as an artist using photography as a medium.

Any tips for the group?
Follow your heart, don’t stop.